NEVADA SUMMARY

POLICY PLAN FOR PUBLIC LANDS

(Note: this document is Chapter 1 from "Nevada Statewide Policy Plan for Public Lands," Nevada Divsion of State Lands and Nevada’s cities and counties, 1985)


PURPOSE

The State Land Use Planning Agency, which is within the Division of State Lands, was directed by the 1983 Legislature through Senate Bill 40 to "prepare, in cooperation with the appropriate state agencies and local governments throughout the state, plans or policy statements concerning the use of lands in Nevada which are under federal management." The plans are a comprehensive set of policies and measures which are designed to increase the role Nevadans have in determining the management of public lands. Within the plans are comprehensive descriptions of problems and opportunities relating to the public lands, as perceived by the state and local governments and citizens of Nevada which must be addressed by the federal public land managing agencies. With these plans the federal land management agencies will be better able to know and to respond in a positive fashion to the concerns and needs of Nevada.

Senate Bill 40 is designed, in part, to take advantage of the consistency language in Section 202(c)(9) of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA). Section 202(c)(9) governs BLM planning and requires that BLM land use plans be consistent with state and local land use plans to the extent that the Secretary of the Interior finds consistent with federal law and the purposes of FLPMA. Senate Bill 40 is intended to give Nevada localities an opportunity to address federal land use management issues directly and thereby offer an alternative to relying solely on after-the-fact reactions to federal proposals. Appendix II is a copy of Senate Bill 40 of the 1983 Legislature.

APPROVAL

Section 3 of Senate Bill 40 (NRS 321.7355) states that "A plan or statement of policy must be approved by the governing bodies of the county and cities affected by it, and by the governor, before it is put into effect." The individual policy plans for public lands developed pursuant to Senate Bill 40 of the 1983 Nevada Legislature were adopted by the counties and affected cities at various times during 1984 and 1985. On June 9, 1986, Governor Richard H. Bryan approved the plans contained herein.

PROCESS

Each local plan was developed by working closely with local elected officials, planning commissions and their staff. Many briefing and planning meetings were held in each city and county. Each plan includes a list of these meetings.

On a statewide basis, state and federal natural resource and land management agencies were briefed and consulted throughout the development of the plans. Appendix I - Statewide Meetings - is a listing of meetings held that were of a regional nature or statewide nature. The effort is unusual for its degree of federal-state-local cooperation

Senate Bill 40 required the Division of State Lands to encourage public comment and involvement. The planning process developed attempted to maximize the public's opportunity to participate. A massive public notification effort, reaching out to more than 4,000 citizens with individually addressed notices in addition to the usual mass media notices, encouraged direct public involvement in each local planning effort. The concerns expressed by citizens and officials at over four hundred meetings and workshops throughout Nevada were used to develop the draft policy plans submitted to each county and city, so that these plans are each uniquely "grass roots" documents.

BACKGROUND

The purpose of this section is to provide some background on Nevada and to illustrate the importance of public lands and their natural resources to the state.

HISTORY OF NEVADA AS A PUBLIC LAND STATE

Nevada, like other western states, is a public land state; that is much of our land is owned and managed by public agencies. Only about thirteen percent of Nevada's land is in private ownership, less than any other state. The reasons for this lie, for the most part, in the past

The State had never seen white men until the late 1700's, when a few Spanish explorers are thought to have penetrated the edges of the area. The earliest known exploration by Anglo-Americans was made by a party led by Jedediah Smith as they passed through the area on a journey from southern California to the Great Salt Lake in 1826. No substantial numbers of pioneers reached Nevada until the California gold rush in 1849 and, later, the discovery of gold and silver on the Comstock in 1859. Yet Nevada became a separate territory in 1861 and a state in 1864. At the time of statehood Nevada had a population of only about 30,000 persons, most of whom lived in the northwestern portion of the state. The remainder of the state was sparsely settled and virtually unexplored.

This rapid move to statehood and sparse population meant that very little land had been claimed for private ownership at the time of statehood. Most of the land was unappropriated public domain, vast stretches of sagebrush desert and rugged mountains.

It appears that the disposition of these open lands was not a controversial issue at the time of statehood. The state accepted from Congress the stipulation in its enabling act that "the Constitutional Convention must disclaim all rights to unappropriated public land in Nevada." The state constitution accordingly ordained: " That the people inhabiting said territory do agree and declare, that they forever disclaim all right and title to the unappropriated public lands . . ." This provision set the stage for years of controversy, continuing to the present day.

In the years that followed, the federal government shifted parts of the public domain to state and private ownership under a variety of programs. The state qualified for several land grants upon statehood, including primarily the grant of the 16th and 36th sections for the support of the public schools. Even here, however, the state's arid climate and sparse population worked to decrease the acreage received. There was insufficient population pressure to drive any significant number of people out onto scattered and hard-to-find desert parcels. In the late 1870's Nevada approached Congress with a request to exchange the 3.9 million acre school land grant of 16th and 36th sections in each township for a grant of lands to be selected by the state. The state intended to select lands in the river valleys and near the existing population centers, where there would be interest in acquisition and settlement. In 1880 Congress agreed and passed the Exchange Act of 1880, specifying that the 3.9 million acres (less 63,249 acres of land already patented) could be exchanged for two million acres of land to be selected by the State. The State thus consented to a reduction of almost half its grant lands. These grant lands were subsequently virtually all patented to private owners.

Federal lands were also available directly to the public. Mining claims could be patented. Soldiers were often paid in scrip that could be exchanged for land. There were a succession of homestead and desert entry acts that made lands available for farms. However, due to the arid climate, relatively few lands were transferred to private ownership through these mechanisms. Many lands in river valleys that might have qualified as farmsteads had already been secured as state grant selections.

In order to encourage the construction of railroads across the nation, the federal government offered "checkerboard" land grants to railroad companies, consisting of alternate sections for twenty miles on each side of the railroad right-of-way. This checkerboard land ownership pattern, established in the 1870's, still stretches across the northern portion of the state in a broad band on each side of the Southern Pacific Railroad. In other states, the alternate sections moved into private ownership as time passed and the state developed. However, in Nevada, arid conditions, topography, soils, sparse population and other factors contributed to the lack of demand for the alternate sections. Some of the five million acres granted to the railroad have been sold to other private parties (the railroad retains about 3.5 million acres today), but the lands retained by the federal government still remain, for the most part, federal lands today.

LAND MANAGEMENT

The total acreage of Nevada encompasses 70,745,600 acres, of which 60,275,632 acres are under federal administration. Most of the public land in Nevada is available for multiple uses such as recreation, grazing, mining, wildlife, and watershed protection.

The impacts of the federal government administering large quantities of land are significant. Two major areas where Nevada is highly impacted are:

  1. The taxable property base is quite small. According to the Nevada Tax Commission, only thirteen percent of the total state acreage is on the tax rolls. In Lincoln County, the worst situation, only 1.6 percent is on the tax roll.
  2. Decisions affecting the use of much of the land in Nevada are made outside the State by persons who may have little understanding of local conditions or the needs of the people who live and do business in the state.

Federal agencies which administer large areas of Nevada include: Fish and Wildlife Service; National Park Service; Bureau of Land Management; Forest Service; Bureau of Reclamation; Department of Energy; and agencies of the Department of Defense (See Table I). In addition, another two percent of Nevada is administered as Indian lands.

 

TABLE I

FEDERAL LAND MANAGEMENT IN NEVADA, 1982

(Department of the Interior, 1983)

Agency

Acreage

Percent of State

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

5,149,684.2

7.28

Forest Service

5,149,684.0

7.28

Soil Conservation Service

0.2

-

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

823,989.0

1.16

Energy Research and Development

819,581.8

1.16

Western Area Power Administration

4,407.2

-

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

51,183,492.1

72.35

Fish and Wildlife Service

2,202,296.7

3.11

Geological Survey

70.8

-

Bureau of Indian Affairs

6,243.6

0.01

Bureau of Land Management

48,281,508.0

68.25

Bureau of Mines

22.6

-

National Park Service

264,137.9

0.37

Bureau of Reclamation

429,212.5

0.61

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

1,863.8

-

Federal Aviation Administration

1,863.6

-

Coast Guard

0.2

-

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

3,116,544.7

4.41

Air Force

2,896,954.0

4.09

Army

155,266.0

0.21

Navy

63,653.7

0.09

Corps of Engineers

671.0

-

 

 

TABLE I (continued)

FEDERAL LAND MANAGEMENT IN NEVADA, 1982

(Department of the Interior, 1983)

Agency

Acreage

Percent of State

OTHER FEDERAL AGENCIES

57.9

-

General Services Administration

13.2

-

Health Services Administration

0.2

-

Postal Service

32.0

-

Veterans Administration

12.5

-

FEDERAL TOTAL

60,275,631.7

85.20

INDIAN LANDS

1,162,950,0

1.64

 

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has management responsibility over a greater share of Nevada than any other federal agency. Table II indicates BLM-managed lands in each county. (These figures may vary from other published sources both because they have been developed individually for each county and also because many lands have not been surveyed. The figures in Table II below, and Table I of each county plan, have been reviewed with the county assessors, county commissioners, and other local officials. Cadastral surveys, the official government surveys of public lands, began in 1861 in Nevada. Through 1983 only about fifty-one million acres or less than three quarters of the state have been surveyed.)

 

POPULATION

The population of Nevada on April 1, 1980, was 800,493. This was approximately sixty-four percent greater than in 1970. Nevada had the highest United States between 1970 and 1980. In contrast, the nation's population between 1970 and 1980 increased by 11.4 percent.

Douglas County has been the State1s fastest growing county with a 182 percent increase in population over the ten-year period between 1970 and 1980. In terms of actual increase in numbers of persons, Clark County far outstripped the rest of the State with an increase of 189,799 persons. Two of Nevada's seventeen counties realized population declines during the same period.

The State has also experienced rapid urbanization. In 1950, for the first time, Nevada's urban population was greater than the rural population. This shift from a rural to an urban environment has continued through 1980 when 85.4 percent of the population resided in an urban setting. This is one of the highest levels of urbanization in any state in the nation.

 

 

TABLE II

BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT LANDS (PUBLIC DOMAIN) BY COUNTY, 1982

County

BLM 
(Public Domain) Lands

Total
County Acreage

Percent BLM

 

Carson City

42,681

97,920

43.6

Churchill County

2,082,045

3,144,320

66.2

Clark County

3,097,131

5,173,760

60.0

Douglas County

186,378

480,650

38.8

Elko County

6,787,646

10,995,840

61.7

Esmeralda County

2,183,277

2,284,800

95.6

Eureka County

2,019,526

2,676,480

75.5

Humboldt County

4,321,854

6,210,560

69.6

Lander County

2,768,444

3,597,440

77.0

Lincoln County

5,738,998

6,816,000

84.2

Lyon County

667,862

1,295,360

52.0

Mineral County

1,693,033

2,455,680

68.9

Nye County

6,703,643

11,560,960

58.0

Pershing County

2,910,424

3,859,840

75.4

Storey County

12,528

167,680

7.5

Washoe County

2,457,884

4,229,120

58.1

White Pine County

4,303,977

5,699,200

76.0

TOTAL

47,977,331

70,745,600

67.8

NOTE: The figures for public domain lands used in this table are from ownership tables developed for each county and which are contained in the individual county plans which follow. These figures may vary from other published public domain acreage totals, including those of the Bureau of Land Management. Many discrepancies in land ownership figures exist for various types of land ownership and are the cause of inconsistencies usually found in compilations of land ownership tables.

POPULATION

The population of Nevada on April 1, 1980, was 800,493. This was approximately sixty-four percent greater than in 1970. Nevada had the highest United States between 1970 and 1980. In contrast, the nation's population between 1970 and 1980 increased by 11.4 percent.

Douglas County has been the State1s fastest growing county with a 182 percent increase in population over the ten-year period between 1970 and 1980. In terms of actual increase in numbers of persons, Clark County far outstripped the rest of the State with an increase of 189,799 persons. Two of Nevada's seventeen counties realized population declines during the same period.

The State has also experienced rapid urbanization. In 1950, for the first time, Nevada's urban population was greater than the rural population. This shift from a rural to an urban environment has continued through 1980 when 85.4 percent of the population resided in an urban setting. This is one of the highest levels of urbanization in any state in the nation.

TABLE III

CENSUS POPULATION OF COUNTIES AND CITIES

Location

1960

1970

1980

Carson City 

8,063

15,468

32,022

Churchill County

8,452

10,513

13,917

 Fallon

2,734

2,959

4,262

Clark County

127,016

273,288

463,087

  Boulder City

4,059

5,223

9,590

  Henderson

12,525

16,395

24,363

  Las Vegas

64,405

125,787

164,674

  North Las Vegas

18,422

46,067

42,739

Douglas County

3,481

6,882

19,421

Elko County

12,011

13,958

17,269

  Carlin

1,023

1,313

1,232

  City of Elko

6,298

7,621

8,758

  Wells

1,071

1,081

1,218

Esmerelda County

619

629

777

Eureka County

767

948

1,198

Humboldt County

5,708

6,375

9,434

  Winnemucca

3,453

3,587

4,140

Lander County

1,566

2,666

4,076

Lincoln County

2,431

2,557

3,732

 

TABLE III (continued)

CENSUS POPULATION OF COUNTIES AND CITIES

Location

1960

1970

1980

  Caliente

792

916

982

Lyon County

6,143

8,221

13,594

  Yerington

1,764

2,010

2,021

Mineral County

6,329

7,051

6,217

Nye County

4,374

5,599

9,048

  Gabbs

770

874

811

Pershing County

3,199

2,670

3,408

  Lovelock

1,948

1,571

1,680

Storey County

568

695

1,503

Washoe County

84,743

121,068

193,623

  Reno

51,470

72,863

100,756

  Sparks

16,618

24,187

40,780

White Pine County

9,808

10,150

8,167

  Ely

4,018

4,176

4,822

Total for state

287,278

488,738

800,493

Nevada's population is expected to reach one million by July 1986. The U.S. Bureau of Census projects that Nevada will remain the fastest growing state in the last two decades of this century.

 

TABLE IV

NEVADA POPULATION PROJECTIONS

(Nevada Office of Community Services, 1984)

County

1985

1990

2000

Carson City

35,150

36,910

45,000

Churchill County

15,150

15,730

17,380

Clark County

567,150

661,700

889,270

Douglas County

24,480

31,250

46,260

Elko County

23,220

30,020

36,590

Esmeralda County

1,000

1,250

1,520

Eureka County

1,550

1,940

2,360

TABLE IV (continued)

NEVADA POPULATION PROJECTIONS

(Nevada Office of Community Services, 1984)

County

1985

1990

2000

Humboldt County

13,660

18,730

22,830

Lander County

6,550

9,640

11,750

Lincoln County

4,890

6,190

7,550

Lyon County

17,320

21,350

26,030

Mineral County

6,210

6,180

6,180

Nye County

20,190

34,790

42,410

Pershing County

4,020

4,590

5,000

Storey County

1,890

2,300

2,800

Washoe County

228,030

270,830

324,040

White Pine County

10,140

11,080

11.280

STATE TOTAL

980,600

1,164,480

1,498,250

EMPLOYMENT

Employment is closely related to population. The two areas with the greatest population are the Reno/Sparks area of Washoe County and the Las Vegas area of Clark County. These two areas serve as economic nuclei for their respective portions of the State and contain most of the business and employment activity.

The primary industry in the urban counties is tourism-gaming-services In the comparatively rural or slower growing areas, the primary industries are mining and agriculture, with some local dependence on tourism, recreation, service, and government sector employment. Mining of resources such as gold, silver, and molybdenum fluctuates depending on national or international demand and resource availability. Agriculture provides a relatively stable economic base. However there are natural and physical resource limitations on agricultural potential, that is, limited water, short growing season, and many areas where the soils are unsuitable for cultivation.

 

 

 

TABLE V

INDUSTRY OF EMPLOYED PERSONS, 1980

(US Bureau of Census Publication PC 80-1~30)

Industry

Employed Persons

Percent of total

Agriculture

6,118

1.54

Forestry/Fisheries

534

0.13

Mining

5,381

1.35

Construction

31,428

7.89

Manufacturing

23,353

5.86

Transportation, Communications, Utilities

30,265

7.59

Wholesale Trade

10,690

2.68

Retail Trade

64,689

16.23

Finance, Insurance, Real Estate

23,844

5.99

Services

176,533

44.29

Public Administration

25,691

6.45

Total

398,566

100.00

 

STATEWIDE ISSUES AND GOALS REGARDING PUBLIC LANDS

The general policy goals for the public lands in Nevada presented here are derived from the goals developed for each county in the state. The individual county plans should be referred to regarding policies affecting the public lands within a specific county.

 

PUBLIC LANDS

The public lands, their use, condition and management, will have a tremendous influence on the future of the state. In many ways, the future growth and lifestyles of Nevada will be determined by actions taken in regard to these lands. It is essential that the present and future interests of the state, its people, and its local units of government be provided for in any action on the public lands.

Goals for Public Lands

Manage and utilize public lands on the basis of multiple use and sustained yield concepts, and in a manner that will conserve natural resources; protect and preserve the quality of the environmental, ecological, scenic, historical and archeological values; protect and preserve wildlife habitat and certain lands in their natural condition; and provide for long term benefits to the people of Nevada and future generations.

Ensure the development of the state's natural resources in a manner consistent with state and local goals regarding the environment, economic development and social concerns.

 

INTERGOVERNMENTAL PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

The planning, management and use of the public lands requires involvement of federal, state and local agencies and units of government. Continued coordination and cooperation in land planning and management will be needed to insure that the use of public lands is in the best interest of Nevada and its residents.

The pressures placed on the natural resources within Nevada and the amount of management required to provide for the availability and integrity of these resources will increase as the state grows. Because natural resources do not recognize political boundaries or agency responsibilities, the management and use of the resources need to be coordinated among local, state and federal agencies whenever management options exist. As pressures and interactions increase, cooperation between agencies will have to increase to insure the effective and efficient management of the resources.

To provide for the adequate future management of the state's resources, information must be available to all planning and management entities. Concerted efforts must be made to increase the amount and compatibility of resource information, and to develop a data base that provides sufficient information for increasingly complex and important resource management decisions.

Goal for Intergovernmental Planning and Management

Maintain and/or increase cooperation and coordination between local, state and federal agencies to facilitate the most effective and beneficial planning and management of Nevada1s natural resources.

 

ACCESS AND TRANSPORTATION

The public lands in Nevada belong to the general public and should by right be accessible to all. Nevada has many old access roads and trails, used for many years, but often never protected by easement or dedication. Problems result when such traditional access ways are closed to public entry. Large areas of public land may be restricted by a relatively small private ownership, such as in the example of a ranch controlling a narrow canyon that is the only access to a forested mountain range. There is also concern that future public land disposals may further restrict access.

Growth and increasing demands for energy within Nevada and the nation call for the provision of corridors for transportation, utilities, and communications to be planned in harmony with other resources on public lands.

Goals for Access and Transportation

Retain existing access to public lands and provide new means of access where necessary.

Develop and maintain a transportation network and utility corridor network across public lands that meets foreseeable future needs while respecting other resource values.

 

AGRICULTURE

Agriculture is a fundamental industry and is especially important to the rural areas of the state. Much of Nevada's agriculture is related to the production of livestock on the public lands.

Many serious problems presently confronting agricultural producers in the State are related to public land management and ownership. Included in this are needs for capital improvements for water and livestock management, difficult economic conditions, need for long term tenure, threats of increasing grazing user fees and competition for forage.

There is some limited potential for the development of some additional private farmland through the Desert Land Act and Carey Act programs.

Goals for Agriculture

Recognize that agricultural production in Nevada will be necessary to help meet the requirements of future state populations and is especially important to the economies of rural counties of the state.

Develop policies and regulations that provide for the long-term productivity and availability of public land resources for agricultural purposes.

Continue to make suitable public lands available for private farmland development through the Desert Land Act and Carey Act programs as water is available and with consideration of other resource needs.

MINERAL RESOURCES

Historically, mineral resources have been extremely important in the growth and development of the state. These resources currently have important economic and social influences on the rural counties of Nevada. Future requirements of the nation and outlooks for the state indicate that mineral resources, many of which are on or under public lands, will continue to be important to Nevada.

Development of mineral resources on public lands may lead to conflicts with competitive resource values (e.g., livestock grazing, hunting).

There are increasing demands for environmental controls on mining projects and for the reclamation or rehabilitation of mined lands. Increased information on the mineral resources and geology of the state is needed, as is information on reclamation potential and techniques. The availability of this information will not only encourage the development of the resources in Nevada, but it will also help provide the necessary information on which management and land use decisions are made.

Goals for Mineral Resources

Recognize that the development of Nevada's mineral resources is desirable and necessary to the nation, the state and, particularly, to the rural counties of the state. Retain existing mining areas and promote the expansion of mining operations and areas, while respecting other resource values.

Develop policies and regulations that provide for the long-term availability and responsible development of Nevada's mineral resources.

 

RECREATION

Recreation is essential to a growing population and in Nevada a great deal of our recreation occurs on the public lands. Nevada is extremely fortunate to have available a wide array of recreational opportunities, and it must strive to enhance and protect these opportunities and the resources on which they are based. It is important that the value of and need for recreation and open space be clearly recognized and provided for in the future.

Non-gaming recreation is a great economic asset to Nevada and can provide for the recreational needs of both Nevadans and tourists while increasing the economic diversification of the state.

Since more than eighty percent of Nevadans reside in urban areas, concentrated efforts to provide recreational opportunities on public lands close to urban populations are desirable.

Recreation needs include the need to identify and preserve significant historic and natural areas in the state.

Goals for Recreation

Develop, conserve and protect scenic, historic and recreational resources for the benefit of present and future generations.

Maintain and improve public access to recreational resources on public lands.

 

NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

As growth and development occur, expanding human needs encroach upon and alter the natural environment and the state's ecosystems. The diversity and viability of these resources must be maintained to insure a high quality of life for Nevadans. Efforts to understand and protect our environment require coordination among federal, state and local officials. The study of environmental impacts must include impacts on natural and human (i.e., socio-economic) resources.

The state and local governments must work with federal land management agencies to consider fully the impacts of wilderness designation on the state, its communities and its people.

Goals for the Natural Environment

Coordinate federal, state, and local efforts to understand and protect the quality of the environment and natural ecosystems, considering also impacts on Nevada's communities and people.

Accept wilderness designation for those wilderness areas where the positive values of wilderness outweigh those resource values and uses which may be foregone due to wilderness designation.

 

WILD HORSES AND BURROS

Wild horses and burros are now protected from all but natural predators. The public lands these animals inhabit and the forage resource are shared by others, such as wildlife and livestock. The wild horses and burros need to be managed as an integral part of the natural system of the public lands.

Goal for Wild Horses

Support the preservation of viable herds of wild horses and burros and their management to minimize detrimental impacts on other multiple uses. Pursue resource enhancement where needed to correct wild horse and burro damage.

 

WILDLIFE

Wildlife is important to Nevada economically and aesthetically, as well as for recreational and scientific reasons. The State has the authority to manage wildlife, and the federal land management agencies manage wildlife habitat on the public lands. Habitat includes food sources, shelter, and water. Habitat alteration and elimination pose the single greatest threat to the continued well-being of healthy and diverse wildlife populations. Measures to counteract this trend require coordinated actions on both private and public lands.

Goals for Wildlife

Protect, manage and provide for reintroduction of wildlife species. Enhance the status of Nevada's wildlife to provide for both consumptive and non-consumptive uses.

Coordinate with federal land management agencies and private users of public lands in cooperative management of the public lands, recognizing that a key to the survival of wildlife populations is habitat in all its varied forms.

 

 

CULTURAL RESOURCES

Nevada is unique among the states in its geography and its history. The state’s image, both of itself and to outsiders, is to a great extent tied up in its past. Physical evidence of Nevada’s past, and man’s presence in this past, is scattered across private and public lands. The public desires to know what cultural resources exist and what can be done to protect them.

Goal for Cultural Resources

Conserve and protect the structures, objects, sites and trails of historic and prehistoric significance found on the public lands for the benefit of present and future generations.

 

APPENDIX I

RECORD OF MEETINGS - STATEWIDE

Date

Meeting

August 22, 1983

Legislature’s Committee on Public Lands, Reno

September 8, 1983

Department of Wildlife, Reno

September 13, 1983

Bureau of Land Management, Nevada State Office - Planning and Environmental Staff, Reno

September 13, 1983

United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Reno

September 14, 1983

Sierra Pacific Power Company, Carson City

September 15, 1983

Department of Agriculture, Reno

September 15, 1983

U.S. Forest Service - Toiyabe National Forest, Reno

September 15, 1983

Department of Wildlife, Reno

September 23, 1983

State Multiple Use Advisory Committee on Federal Lands, Reno

September 26, 1983

Department of Transportation, Carson City

September 26, 1983

Division of State Parks, Carson City

September 26, 1983

Division of Environmental Protection, Carson City

September 27, 1983

Division of Historic Preservation and Archeology, Carson City

September 28, 1983

Bureau of Reclamation, Department of the Interior, Carson City

September 28, 1983

Indian Tribal Commission, Carson City

October 3, 1983

Division of Forestry, Carson City

October 3, 1983

Office of Community Services, Carson City

October 12, 1983

Division of Water Resources, Carson City

October 12, 1983

State Engineer, Carson City

October 12, 1983

Division of Water Planning, Carson City

October 17, 1983

State Land Use Planning Conference, Reno

October 17, 1983

State Land Use Planning Advisory Council Meeting, Reno

RECORD OF MEETINGS – STATEWIDE (continued)

Date

Meeting

October 19, 1983

U.S. Forest Service - Humboldt National Forest, Carson City

November 1, 1983

Association of Governments of Northwestern Colorado, Redstone, Colorado

November 16, 1983

Nevada Association of Conservation Districts Annual Meeting, Winnemucca

November 21, 1983

Nevada Prospectors and Miners Association, Reno

December 21, 1983

Nevada Resource Action Council, Reno

January 26, 1984

Senator Laxalt's Office, Carson City Office, Carson City

January 26, 1984

Senator Hecht's Office, Carson City

January 26, 1984

Legislative Counsel Bureau, Carson City

January 26, 1984

National Wildlife Federation Western Regional Coordinator, Carson City

January 26, 1984

Nevada Pony Express Association, Carson City Toiyabe

February 7, 1984

Chapter of the Sierra Club, Reno

February 21, 1984

Coordinated Resource Management and Planning Executive Group, Reno

February 21, 1984

David Williams, Bureau of Land Management, Washington, D.C.; in Reno

February 22, 1984

State Conservation Commission, Carson City

February 24, 1984

Nevada Indian Commission, Carson City

March 2, 1984

Nevada Resource Action Council, Reno

March 5, 1984

Toiyabe Chapter of Sierra Club, Las Vegas

March 5, 1984

Red Rock Audubon Society, Las Vegas

March 6, 1984

Administrative Assistant to Congressman Reid, Las Vegas

March 8, 1984

Boy Scouts of America, Las Vegas

March 15, 1984

Nevada Outdoor Recreation Association, Carson City

March 26, 1984

Department of Minerals, Carson City

April 25, 1984

Nevada Resource Action Council, Reno

April 27, 1984

State Land Use Planning Advisory Council, Yerington

May 2, 1984

State Parks Advisory Commission, Las Vegas

May 4, 1984

Legislative Commission on Federal Lands, Las Vegas

RECORD OF MEETINGS – STATEWIDE (continued)

Date

Meeting

May 30, 1984

Department of Economic Development, Carson City

June 6, 1984

Nevada Prospectors and Miners Association, Hawthorne

June 11, 1984

Nevada Range Committee, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno

June 14, 1984

Nevada Association of Counties, Carson City

June 21, 1984

Commission on Mineral Resources, Sparks 

June 29, 1984

State Multiple Use Advisory Committee on Federal Lands, Reno

July 6, 1984

Nevada Resource Action Council, Reno 

July 10, 1984

Nevada Public Affairs Institute, University of Nevada-Reno, Carson City

September 6, 1984

Ash Meadows Refuge Development Meeting, Las Vegas

September 7, 1984

Legislature's Committee on Public Lands, Ely

September 25, 1984

State Conservation Commission, Carson City

September 26, 1984

State Land Use Planning Advisory Council, Ely

September 27, 1984

State Land Use Planning Conference, Ely

October 5, 1984

Nevada Resource Action Council, Reno

November 13, 1984

State Land Use Planning Advisory Council, Elko

November 27, 1984

State Conservation Commission, Fallon

November 30, 1984

Legislature's Committee on Public Lands, Carson City 

December 14, 1984

State Multiple Use Advisory Committee on Federal Lands, Reno

January 11, 1985

Nevada Resource Action Council, Reno

January 11, 1985

Nevada Department of Commerce, Director, Carson City

February 26, 1985

State Conservation Commission, Carson City

April 3, 1985

Nevada Conservation Forum, Reno

April 10, 1985

Legislative Committee on Public Lands, Carson City

April 15, 1985

Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Carson City

April 26, 1985

State Land Use Planning Advisory Council, Carson City 

RECORD OF MEETINGS – STATEWIDE (continued)

Date

Meeting

April 26, 1985

State Multiple Use Advisory Committee on Federal Lands, Carson City

May 22, 1985

State Conservation Commission, Carson City 

June 5, 1985

Bureau of Land Management, Nevada State Office - Planning and Environmental Staff, Reno

March 12, 1986

Reno State Board of Review, Reno

 

 

APPENDIX II

 

Senate Bill No. 40 – Committee on Natural Resources

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEVADA, REPRESENTED IN SENATE

AND ASSEMBLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

Section 1. Chapter 321 of NRS is hereby amended by adding thereto a new section which shall read as follows:

1. The state land use planning agency shall Prepare1 In cooperation with appropriate state agencies and local governments throughout the State, plans or policy statements concerning the use of lands in Nevada which are under federal management. The plans or policy statements must not include matters concerning zoning or the division of land and must be consistent with local plans and regulations concerning the use of private property.

2. The state land use planning agency shall encourage public comment upon the various matters treated in a proposed plan or policy statement throughout its preparation and shall submit its work on a plan or statement of policy periodically for review and comment by the land use planning advisory council, the state multiple use advisory committee on federal lands, the board of review created pursuant to NRS 321.5967 and any committees of the legislature or subcommittees of the legislative commission which deal with matters concerning the public lands.

3. A plan or statement of policy must be approved by the governing bodies of the county and cities affected by it, and by the governor, before it is put into effect.

Sec. 2. NRS 321.5967 is hereby amended to read as follows:

321.5967 I. There is hereby created a board or review composed of the:

(a) Director of the state department of conservation and natural resources;

(b) Administrator of the division of environmental protection of the slate department of conservation and natural resources;

(c) Administrator of the division of mineral resources of the state department of conservation and natural resources;

(d) Administrator of the division of state parks of the state department of conservation and natural resources;

(e) State engineer;

(f) State forester fire warden;

(g) Chairman of the state environmental commission;

(h) Director of the department of energy;

(i) Executive director of the state department of agriculture;

(j) The chairman of the board of wildlife commissioners; and

(k) Administrator of the division of historic preservation and archeology of the state department of conservation and natural resources.

2. The chairman of the state environmental commission shall serve as chairman of title board.

3. The hoard shall meet at such times and places as are specified by a call of the chairman. Six members of the board constitute a quorum. The affirmative vote of a majority of the board members present is sufficient for any action of the board.

4. Except as provided in this subsection, the members of the board serve without compensation. The chairman of the stale environmental commission and (lie chairman of the board of wildlife commissioners are entitled to receive a salary of $60 for each day's attendance at a meeting of (he board and the travel expenses and subsistence allowances provided by law for state officers.

5. The board:

(a) Shall review and approve or disapprove all regulations proposed by the state land registrar under NRS 321.597.

(b) May review any decision of the state land registrar made pursuant to NRS 321.596 to 321.599, inclusive, if an appeal is taken pursuant to NRS 321.5987, and affirm, modify or reverse the decision.

(c) Shall review any plan or statement of policy concerning the use of lands in Nevada under federal management which is submitted by the state land use planning agency.

Sec. 3. NRS 321.735 is hereby amended to read as follows:

321.735 The state land use planning agency [shall review and evaluate land use policies and activities for lands in Nevada which are under federal management, and] may represent the interests of the state, its local or regional entities, or its citizens as these interests are affected by [federal land use] policies and activities [involving the use of federal land].

Sec. 4. The state land use planning agency shall report the progress and any results of its work under section I of this act to the 63rd session of the legislature.